Help from community members for the Berea household members who lost all in fire

Some donations made by the community to help the people that lost everything in the fire.

Killarney Rosebank Gazette

27th June 2017

HOUGHTON – A company rallied together to collect donations for community members who lost everything in a fire.

On Saturday 17 June at 4am a house in Berea on the corner of Tudhope and Primrose Terrace was engulfed in flames. The cause of the fire is still being investigated by Johannesburg Emergency Services.

The house was occupied by 32 people including women and children, some as young as a few months old. The ward councillor and local City of Joburg EMS disaster management representatives arrived at the scene sometime after and found that the victims had lost everything including clothing, money and identification.

Community members offload the donations to be given to those that lost everything in a fire

At 1.30pm, via social media, a call was made to Yusuf Abramjee and Yaseen Theba (Director of Vision Tactical, a Houghton-based company) from #OperationSA to assist with the victim’s immediate needs. Theba arrived to meet with victims of the fire and representatives from Joburg City Council and disaster management at 2pm and together they made an assessment of the immediate needs.

A collection point was set up at a client’s premises in Houghton.

Within two hours, Vision Tactical mobilised their clients to arrange the following:

  • Blankets
  • Food
  • Clothing
  • Toiletries and hygiene packs.

Theba explained that the response was overwhelming. Clients dropped off food supplies, blankets, and everything else that was required for the immediate needs of the Berea Fire victims. Three 1- tonne vehicles filled to capacity arrived at 4.30pm at the premises and handed over donations to the councillor and disaster management to be distributed to the residents of the burnt house.

“We will keep in contact with residents and the councillor to continue assessing the damage and needs of the victims of this devastating fire. We thank the generous clients and friends who opened their hearts to assist at this time of need – this is the spirit of Ubuntu,” said Theba.

Houghton-based security company provides drone technology to create safer community

HOUGHTON – Drone support may help police officers see various crimes happening in real time.

May 24, 2017 – Rosebank Killarney Gazette

 

Vision Tactical, a security company which is based in Houghton, recently launched drone capabilities which will deliver air support to security and emergency services.

Drones are being used by tactical teams and response officers to respond to crime incidents as well as in the search for missing people and the monitoring of traffic around road accidents.

“We remain committed to embracing new technologies to deliver high quality, cost-effective services and protection,” said Yaseen Theba, director of Vision Tactical.

The technology will be used to enhance and improve traditional methods of responding to emergencies. Vision Tactical currently uses the DJI Phantom 4 Drone and the Parrot Bebop Drone, which is controlled by a close ground support package.

The success of this advancement is the proactive real-time intelligence it provides during rapidly evolving situations such as shootings, robberies, hijackings, rescue operations and other high-risk missions. Trials and consultations are ongoing to develop more guidance for how the drones will be used more effectively to help keep the community safe by offering an aerial perspective of scenes.

Do you believe that the drone could be of great help for the community? Tweet @RK_Gazette and let us know.

Quick car & even quicker thinking

Killarney Rosebank Gazette – May 18, 2017

A vigilant driver was able to escape a hijacking recently on Central Street in Houghton.

According to the director of Vision Tactical Yaseen Theba, CCTV footage shows a Porsche driver entering the driveway of an office park when hijackers pull up behind him on May 13.

In the footage, one hijacker jumps out of the passenger side of the vehicle and walks towards the Porshe, pointing a firearm.

The Porsche driver quickly reverses out of the driveway and slams into the back of the hijackers’ silver BMW, before speeding away. The surprised hijacker is seen dithering, unsure of what to do next.

Theba confirmed to the Gazette that a few days after the incident, the hijackers’ vehicle was found between Alex and Midrand. However, he indicated that even though the car was found, there have been no arrests.

The spokesperson for Norwood Police Station, Captain Elliot Tshiyhase, confirmed the incident but said a case of pointing a firearm was opened, not an attempted hijacking.

Tshiyhase said the case is currently under investigation by Norwood police.

Providing safe return from airport

The Star Page 5 – 23rd May 2017

THE RISE in crimes committed around OR Tambo International Airport, including people being followed home from the airport and robbed, has spawned an interesting and lucrative business.

Vision Tactical is a security company that began in October 2014, which provides private security to homes and businesses in Houghton, Killarney, Norwood and other suburbs in northern Joburg.

Vision Tactical Owner: Yaseen Theba , speaks about the burgeoning crime of being followed back home from the airport.

Recently, the company expanded its security services to include airport escorts, because according to the company’s owner, Yaseen Theba, clients started becoming nervous about coming back from the airport and asked for vehicles to be stationed on driveways outside their homes for safety purposes.

“Then certain people felt nervous about landing at night or early mornings and asked if we could provide a guard inside the car that was going to pick them up.

“But we prefer using our own vehicles to follow our clients, because in the event something happens, we have our rifles and guns in the car.

“If it’s a family pick-up, we don’t like to have firearms in the vehicle when there are children. We prefer following a vehicle and ensuring that a family get home safely,” Theba explained.

Last Monday, a man was shot dead just outside OR Tambo International Airport’s drop-off area, in what was believed to have been a botched hijacking.

HAPPY ABOUT THE SERVICE: Dharmisha Makan speaks about her experience being followed back home from the airport.  Picture: Nhlanhla Phillips

It was this report that convinced Dharmisha Makan to use the escort service for the first time when she and a friend came back from India last week.

“As two women travelling on our own, we definitely felt safe just to know that we’re being followed by a security company that we are familiar with, as they do the guarding at our complex.

“They followed both of us to our homes and we felt safe. So did our family members, who knew we were going to make it home safe,” Makan enthused, adding that she would “definitely” use the service again.

Theba added that he was aware the police were trying to curb the crime of airport followings by doing stop and searches of cars leaving the airport.

“Then certain people felt nervous about landing at night or early mornings and asked if we could provide a guard inside the car that was going to pick them up.

“But we prefer using our own vehicles to follow our clients, because in the event something happens, we have our rifles and guns in the car.

“If it’s a family pick-up, we don’t like to have firearms in the vehicle when there are children. We prefer following a vehicle and ensuring that a family get home safely,” Theba explained.

Last Monday, a man was shot dead just outside OR Tambo International Airport’s drop-off area, in what was believed to have been a botched hijacking.

It was this report that convinced Dharmisha Makan to use the escort service for the first time when she and a friend came back from India last week.

“As two women travelling on our own, we definitely felt safe just to know that we’re being followed by a security company that we are familiar with, as they do the guarding at our complex.

“They followed both of us to our homes and we felt safe. So did our family members, who knew we were going to make it home safe,” Makan enthused, adding that she would “definitely” use the service again.

ON ALERT: A panic button was activated while The Star was patrolling with Vision Tactical in Houghton. It took the response unit roughly three minutes to react, but it turned out to be a false alarm.   Picture: Nhlanhla Phillips

Theba added that he was aware the police were trying to curb the crime of airport followings by doing stop and searches of cars leaving the airport.

But he said some of his clients were apprehensive about the police because of reports that officers – or people disguised as law enforcement personnel – were also part of criminal activity around the airport.

This has to do with the brazen airport heist in March, where more than R20 million was stolen by robbers who, it is believed, included police officers and airport security personnel.

“There are times when people get nervous about being questioned by police.

“People are nervous about sharing information with police at the airport because they are living in fear due to the reports about officers being involved in some of these crimes,” Theba said.

“So, if they know that they are dealing with a security company that they know and trust, they feel a lot more comfortable to talk to the police. That’s what we are trying to do – making people feel a lot safer.”

The company, Theba said, employed only highly skilled personnel, such as Boloka “Bravo 7” Diale.

He is a commander within Vision Tactical, and told The Star he was trained in special weapons and tactics, or Swat, and previously worked for the US Embassy and a cash-in-transit company.

Asked what the scariest part of the job was, Diale asserted: “For me, there is no scary part, because I am used to it. Maybe if I was starting out it would be scary, but right now it’s like having bread with tea.”

VISION TACTICAL LAUNCHES DRONE SUPPORT

MEDIA STATEMENT FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Friday – 12th March 2017

VISION TACTICAL LAUNCHES DRONE SUPPORT

Vision Tactical has launched Drone capabilities delivering air support to security and emergency services. It is being used by tactical teams and response officers to respond to incidents of crime, search for missing people and monitor traffic around road accidents.

We have identified the use of technology to enhance and improve on traditional methods of responding to emergencies. Vision Tactical currently uses the DJI Phantom 4 drone and the Parrot Bebop Drone, which is controlled by a close ground support package. The success of this advancement is the proactive real-time intelligence it provides during rapidly evolving situations such as shootings, robberies, hijackings, rescue operations and other high-risk missions.

Trials and consultations are ongoing to develop more guidance for how Vision Tactical will use drones more effectively to help keep our clients safe offering an aerial perspective of scenes.

“We remain committed to embracing new technologies to deliver high-quality, cost effective services and protection” – Yaseen Theba, director of Vision Tactical.

ENQUIRIES:

Yaseen Theba

Cell 064 400 0000

www.visiontactical

Learn how to survive the chaos of a violent protest.

We find ourselves in tense times currently and many people are not happy with their circumstances. Couple that with ‘powers-that-be’ who wish to agitate (divide and conquer) in an attempt to control an outcome. Sad to say, but recent changes in our country have made it necessary for people to learn how to survive the chaos of a violent protest.

Avoidance is probably the first step, with social media now providing an excellent way of tracking this.

In a large crowd, the energy of mass emotion can be contagious and rapidly spiral out of control. It often will only take one person to set a chain reaction in motion of high emotion or chaos. Recent protests may have become violent by agitators who have been planted there to set things in motion.

Stay calm and keep your emotions in check. Violent protests & riots coincide with intense emotions that boil to the surface, but if you want to survive one you would be better off keeping your own emotions in check. In the heat of the moment, your adrenaline and survival instincts will kick in, but try to think rationally and pursue safety in a methodical manner.

Avoid confrontation. The presumption here is that you have not intended to participate in a choas, so do not engage with others. Keep your head down, while at the same time looking for safe exit, but maintain situational awareness.

Mob or Herd mentality is sometimes a fear-based reaction to peer pressure which makes individuals act in order to avoid feeling “left behind” from the group.

People in a violent mob will believe they cannot be held responsible for violent behavior because they perceive the violent action as the group’s (e.g., “everyone was doing it”) rather than their own behavior. When in a large group, people tend to experience less individual responsibility. Typically, the bigger a mob, the more its members lose self-awareness and become willing to engage in dangerous behavior. When people feel that their behavior cannot be traced back to them, they are more likely to break social norms and engage in violence. Group violence is most likely to occur when the group is large, and people are able to remain anonymous.

Do not be singled out – just keep moving without engaging. Even if your emotional state wants to challenge the protest or the looting, don’t do it. There’s absolutely nothing to gain – you are not going to change anyone’s mind at this point…

Walk. Don’t run. Don’t stop. If you run or go too quickly, you might attract unwanted attention.

Move inside and stay there. Typically riots happen in the streets, or somewhere outside. Being inside, especially in a large and sturdy structure, can be good protection to wait it out. (though beware of potential looting)

Keep your doors and windows locked. Don’t watch the riot from windows or balconies. Move to inside rooms, where the danger of being hit by stones, bullets, ect is minimized. Try to find at least two possible exits in case you need to evacuate the building in a hurry.

Stay on the sidelines. If you’re caught up in a chaos, don’t take sides. Try to look as inconspicuous as possible, and slowly and carefully move to the outside of the mob. Stay close to walls or other protective barriers if possible but try to avoid bottlenecks of people. These are areas where the crowd can be squashed into a tight place, such as passages, pillars, high fences and walls that go on for a long way.

It’s hard to tell the victims from the violent protestors in a chaotic environment, and if you approach the police for help at that time, they may mistake that for intent to harm. This tip might seem a little counter-intuitive at first, but it really is a smart move during a violent protest. Whether or not you are involved in a protest, be careful of how you approach authorities – try to ensure you are not seen as a threat.

Once you are personally safe (with or without your vehicle) call family or friends to let them know where you are, and what is happening.

If you’re caught up in a car, stay calm. Remain inside the car unless your car becomes a focus for the riot, in which case it risks being torched, smashed or rolled over. Calmly and swiftly leave it behind and get to safety if that happens. If people seem to block your escape route; use your hooter, and carefully drive through or around them at a moderate speed, and they should move out of the way. Driving towards police lines can be interpreted by the police as a preparation to use the car as a weapon against them. DON’T DO IT.

Move away from the riot. The more time you spend in the midst of the chaos, the greater your chance of being injured or killed. That said, in most circumstances it’s better to move out of a protest and choas slowly. It can also be dangerous to move against a crowd, so go with the flow until you are able to escape into a doorway or into a street away from the crowd. Think of crowd movement like currents in the ocean. In a large riot, the crowd in the middle will be moving faster than the people on the perimeters. As such, if you find yourself in the middle, you should not try to move in a different direction, but follow the flow and slowly make your way to the outside. This requires patience in order to work properly.

Watch your footing in a mob situation. If you stumble and fall to the ground you’re likely to be trampled. This is especially dangerous in stadiums and other enclosed areas, where many unfortunate victims have been crushed to death. If you fall down, pull yourself up into a ball. Protect your face, ears and internal organs. In this position you are a smaller object that can be avoided. You will receive less damage if you are stepped on. If others trip on you they will help create a larger “pile” that rioters will avoid.

If you’re with your family or a group of friends when the chaos breaks loose, make sure to stick together.

If at all possible, try to agree to a good meeting place to regroup at ahead of time. Your time is better spent looking for an exit instead of trying to find people who’ve gotten lost.

When a riot breaks out, one of the most common crowd dispersion tools used by police or military is tear gas.

Note: ‘Tear Gas’ is technically a micro-pulverized powder dispensed with a pressure sprayer, or various grenade-like canisters. If it is in the eyes, to clear the eyes have the victim lie down, turn his head to the side and wash the eyes with water or saline. You are removing the micro-pulverized powder from the eyes and face and not washing it over into the other eye.

Keep emergency numbers stored in your phone on speed dial. This is a good idea in general – they are always handy in an emergency:

  • Vision Tactical
  • 084 222 2222
  • SAPS
  • 10111
  • Emergency Dial (Cell Phone)
  • 112
  • ER 24
  • 084 124

 

#ORTamboHeist: Three accused get bail

Lindi Masinga
Johannesburg – Three men alleged to be involved in the heist at the OR Tambo International Airport in March were granted bail – collectively amounting to R30 000 – by the Kempton Park Magistrate’s Court on Monday.Sibusiso Mnisi, Prince Dube and Thando Sonqishe are facing charges of robbery with aggravating circumstances for their alleged involvement in what is considered one of South Africa’s biggest heists.

Magistrate Amukelani Msineki granted Sibusiso Mnisi R50 000 bail and he has to report four times a week to the Kempton Park police station.

He is not allowed to leave Gauteng until the matter is finalised unless he gets permission by the investigating officer.

Earlier, the magistrate said that Mnisi’s defence council had to prove that there were exceptional circumstances that made him qualify for bail. She said that the state and defence had agreed that the charges he was facing fell under schedule five on the Criminal Procedure Act. Mnisi, 39, made his bail application on March 31. He told the court that he was a maintenance worker and earned R7 000.

In his affidavit Mnisi denied being involved in the heist and that there was no evidence linking him to the crime. He said that his admission statement was made under duress.

Investigating officer Colonel Mabina Mahlangu alleged that Mnisi supplied the cellphones that were used by the suspects to communicate. Mnisi said that he had no previous convictions and the state did not bring forward any information of previous misconduct.

Magistrate Msineki said that there was no reason to suspect that Mnisi had any previous convictions. She said the accused had strong emotional ties in South Africa as his family was based in the country. He has no passport to travel outside the country.

The magistrate added that the admission statement could be used during the trial stage and that investigations were still under way and further evidence could emerge. “There’s nothing that links the applicant, except the admission statement.

The state did not show this court how the applicant was involved,” Msineki said.

The magistrate granted Prince Dube R150 000 bail including conditions of reporting Monday to Friday and twice on weekends and that he had to surrender all his traveling documents. During judgement, Msineki said that Dube denied being involved in the heist and that there was no evidence linking him to the crime. In his affidavit dube said he earned R400 000 per month.

Later in court the accused said the amount was in fact his annual income.

“Colonel Mahlangu found that he had four previous convictions and it was contradictory to Dube’s affidavit which said that he had two previous convictions.” Dube’s defence said that he couldn’t remember all his convictions as they happened many years ago.

The investigation officer found that Dube was not a documented citizen and that he was from Zimbabwe.

The accused has four previous convictions of which he only disclosed two. Mahlangu said the accused was most likely to evade trial and commit other crimes.

However, the magistrate said setting strict bail conditions could prevent Dube from evading trial. She said that the state had not given evidence or documents proving that Dube was a Zimbabwean or that he was illegally residing in South Africa.

“The identity number provided was used to find his previous convictions, it was used by SARS to find the various companies he owns.” Msineki said that the state’s case was doubted as Dube was merely linked by an admission statement.

“There’s nothing that links the accused to this case and that he was on the scene on commission of the offence. A SBV uniform was found in his possession, not a SAPS uniform.” Msineki said that the investigation officer said that the money found could be linked to the crime, but there was no evidence directly linking it to the heist.

Due to technical difficulties, the full judgment of Thando Sonqishe could not be read. The magistrate granted Thando Sonqishe bail of R100 000 and he has to report to the Midrand Police Station seven days a week and that he has to notify the investigating officer if he wished to leave the province. Court was adjourned to Tuesday.